History of Scouting

Scouting has always been a dynamic and forward-looking Movement. In the early days of Scouting, Lord Baden-Powell saw the need to provide a programme for young people who wanted to continue after their time in the Scout Section. Senior Scouts was developed to meet this need, and the Section continued to evolve over the years.

In 1967, Venture Scouting was formed from the existing Senior Scout and Rover Scout Sections. During the late 1990s, it was decided that, in order to meet the changing needs of new generations, two new Sections should be created for young people over the age of fourteen. Explorer Scouts for 14 to 18-year-olds and the Scout Network for 18 to 25-year-olds were created.

From the first experimental camp for 20 boys in 1907, the movement now has an estimated 38 million members worldwide, and in the UK alone there are over half a million boys and girls involved in Scouting. An increase in adult volunteers means that more and more young people are now able to take part in their own big adventure.

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